Games to expand your brain power

Brain Dome photo CC: CNP

Brain Dome photo CC: CNP

Hundreds of children and their parents participated in the Brain Games which returned to Cardiff’s National Museum over the weekend.

Cardiff University held this event to allow people to find out more about how their brains work. In conjunction with the Brain Awareness Week, the University hopes to increase public awareness of the progress and benefits of brain research.

Beth Routley photo CC: CNP

Beth Routley photo CC: CNP

Beth Routley, the lead coordinator of the event, says that this kind of event can encourage families to come together to do some social activities rather than stay at home at the weekend. She is also the Public Outreach Officer at CUBRIC (Cardiff University’s Brain Research Imaging Centre).

”We get about three thousands visitors to come every year, so it’s obviously a great interest in what we are doing. We have many researchers here who come here to speak with people with their research. It’s really important to engage the public with what we are doing, and this in turn can help us to decide what we can do next,” she says.

''Brain Games'' photo CC: CNP

”Brain Wars” photo CC: CNP

''Shrinking'' Chair photo CC: CUBRIC

”Shrinking Chair” photo CC: CUBRIC

Children enjoyed playing different kinds of games which were designed to stimulate their young minds. In the game called ”Brain Wars”, they were able to learn how to use the power of their brain to move a ball. They also learnt how their brains can be tricked with what is seen and tasted in games like ”Shrinking Chair” and ”Taste Twister”.

Modelling Clay photo CC: CNP

Modelling Clay photo CC: CNP

Drawing a model brain photo CC: CNP

Drawing a model brain photo CC: CNP

As well as primary school children, even some toddlers discovered how the brain looks and works through simple games like drawing, making crafts and using clay to make a model brain.

Beth Routley says what they really want to do is to make children understand more about their brains and engage in science as a subject in general.

”We are trying to get kids early to start thinking about what they are interested in and what they are going to study and to find a career.

The national curriculum is great, but it doesn’t have such a specific thing about brain. Lots of children study human body, and brain is a part of that. We have been to schools before the event and give children a sample list about what their brains do, and it fits quite nicely with what they are learning in science classes, ” she says.

The University continues to make efforts to further its research in psychology, psychiatry and neuroscience, and these events, may inspire the next generation of neurologist and psychiatrist.

Camera and editing by: Liao Xuezhou

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