Climb the ‘highest’ wall for rescuing climbers

 

Photo: CNP

 

Cardiff University Mountaineering Club held an event to climb the equivalent of Mount Everest (8848 meters). It meant scaling an 8 meter high wall more than a thousand of times.

It is to make fundraising for the Lochaber Mountain Rescue Team (LMRT) which is a climbers rescue team built in the late 1960s by  climbers in Scotland. They carry out over 100 mountain rescues every year. Most are on Ben Nevis while they also cover over five thousand square kilometers. Until now, they have approximately forty men and women of different ages ranging from early twenties to early sixties.

Alex Seekings, the organizer says, this activity has two aims. The first one is to raise 1500 pounds and donate this money to the rescue team and they hope the money will be spent in rescuing more climbers in difficulties.  The second aim is to climb the walls in the gym until the height is equivalent to the Mountain Everest (8848 meters). As Louis Sherratt, a member of the club says, “I have climbed a lot outside in real mountains, but this one is more difficult because we need to climb the wall as much times as quickly.” After four hours of effort, they have almost achieved their fundraising aim, and have climbed 17,728 meters which is equal to two Everest’s height.  

Photo: CNP

It also to commemorate a member of the University Club, Patrick Boothroyd, who died in a mountain climbing accident last year. LMRT played an important role in that rescue mission. According to the organizer of this activity, Alex Seekings, the team used helicopter and hired specialists to search and rescue Patrick who had the accident in Mountain Ben Nevis whilst climbing. He was airlifted to the Belford Hospital but died from his injuries. Alex said: “We want to organize this activity to raise money for a charity for the rescue organisation that rescued a friend of us who passed away later. we just want the money to go to wherever they think it would be best.”

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